THE SCIENCE OF BUILDING A BETTER BALE


Not all bales are built the same. You need a combination of the right preparation and the right equipment to achieve a denser, more nutritious bale. Plus, higher bale density means less time spent in the field. Lower your fuel and labor costs while saving on supplies and transport. To help you get started with better baling, we’ve broken it down into three steps.

Better baling starts with a cleaner cut

Denser, more nutritious bales start with cutting it right and drying it fast. Dense bales retain higher feed quality for the best animal results. Cleaner cutting, with durable mowers that are able to easily follow the contours of your land, will ensure that all of your crop is harvested, leaving nothing behind. Follow that with faster drying and you’re well on your way to higher quality feed.


Read More
GO TO STEP ONE

High-density bales = higher nutrition and profit

After you’ve cut and dried your crop quickly and efficiently, it’s important to bale your crop properly. It’s proven that a denser bale has a lower pH and sugar content, an indicator of proper fermentation and prolonged forage stability. High-density bales also last up to 25 hours longer before spoiling, saving up to $12,371, or 95 tons of wasted bales across 6,500 silage bales per year.¹


Read More
GO TO STEP TWO

Time to finish strong

Once you’ve cut and baled it, you’ve got to think about what’s next. Luckily, with a smaller number of denser bales, you have less to worry about. In fact, you could save up to $16,600 per year on net and film wrap when you increase your bale density by 39%.² Better yet, you’ll reduce or totally eliminate losses due to excess bales being stored outdoors.


Read More
GO TO STEP THREE

Take the road to a better bale

The road to building a better bale is shorter than you might think. View the infographic to learn about the haymaking solutions for producing high-quality, high-density bales, and the savings along the way.


Read More
DOWNLOAD THE INFOGRAPHIC

¹ 5x6 silage round bales, 2% waste on 6,500 bales, 95 tons crop wasted @ $130/ton.
² 5x6 round bales with a 39% density difference, 4,000 dense bale yield vs. 6,500 less dense bale yield, 56.5 ft. net per bale, 3 wraps/bale @ $0.029/ft., film wrap @ $0.053/ft. and 16 bales wrapped per film roll.

Kongskilde:
Top Service:


New Holland Agriculture a brand of CNH Industrial ©
back to top